Hellenistic, Ottoman-Era Shipwrecks Found Near Cyprus

Hellenistic, Ottoman-Era Shipwrecks Found Near Cyprus

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Two shipwrecks off Cyprus – from ancient Greece and the Ottoman times – have been discovered, among others, after a two-week long exploration of the American E/V Nautilus in the deep ocean.

Headed by the famous oceanographer and underwater archaeologist Robert Ballard, the team of divers explored the Eratosthenes Seamount off the city of Paphos.

According to Cyprus-Mail.com, a 2,300-2,500-year-old shipwreck, complete with a cargo consisting of a selection of ceramic vessels of a variety of sizes and shapes, including two pithoi was found.

Two anchors, a possible bun ingot, and several unidentified artifacts were also photographed at the wreck site which measured 30 metres long and 10-meters wide. The analysts said they believe that the ship used to carry products from ancient Greece to Cyprus and vice-versa.

The second shipwreck dating back to the Ottoman Empire is a war galley found in a depth of 3,000 feet, along with a 18th-Century flintlock pistol which appeared to be remarkably well preserved.

More than 160 artifacts have been recorded and photographed by geologists and marine biologists since the project began in early August. Fifty scientists were on board, including a Cypriot seismologist from the Geological Survey Department of Cyprus, who is in charge of delivering all findings from the explorations.

The project is aimed at revealing the geological and marine characteristics and secrets of the Seamount, which is one of the biggest in the Eastern Mediterranean. The American scientists claimed they have gathered samples from the Seamount for geological and biological research purposes, but denied speculations they found a ship that carried gold during World War II.