Excavations in Cyprus show Contact with Neighbours in Neolithic Times

Archaeologists in Cyprus discovered a number of objects near the towns of Paphos, that reveal contact between Cyprus and inhabitants of other coasts in Neolithic times.

During excavations a number of shallow pits were found, many containing broken objects placed in a ritualistic manner, including stone vessels, human remains and a fragment of an anthropomorphic clay figurine.

The discovery of a rare stone-shaped engraved object confirms that the site was in use during the Aceramic Neolithic period.

These engraved stone objects have also been found in the neighbouring locations of Choletria-Ortos, Choirokitia and Lebanon.

Although their use has not yet been established, these objects reveal contact between Cyprus and inhabitants of other coasts at a time when the island’s special Neolithic culture is thought to have been developed, says a report in Cyprus-Mail.

The discoveries were announced by the department of antiquities on Monday at the completion of this year’s archaeological investigations at the site.

The expedition is a yearly project under the direction of Andrew McCarthy, Fellow of the School of History, Classics and Archaeology at the University of Edinburgh, and the Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute (CAARI).

Source: Cyprus-Mail