Amazing Ancient Greek Carving Baffles Scientists



The Bronze Age gem carving found in Pylos, Greece.

A carved gem found in a 3,500-year-old grave in Pylos, Greece is still mystifying scientists who cannot fathom how such advanced engraving skills originated in the Bronze Age period.

U.S. broadcaster CNN on Saturday reported how husband-and-wife team Jack Davis and Sharon Stocker spearheaded a dig in 2015 which has since thrown up 1,400 items from Greece’s ancient past.

Among them is a tiny treasure measuring just 3.6 centimeters (1.4 inches) which, when cleaned by unsuspecting researchers, yielded an engraving of such high quality it has left scientists baffled and challenged much of what we know about Greek art.

The engraving — a fight scene between two warriors, with a third dying on the ground — is so small, a microscope is needed to fully see its intricate detail, begging the question: how could a Bronze-Age artist create such a wonder?

“The amount of skill that was required to execute such an intricate design on such a small surface is unbelievable,” Stocker told CNN.

The Pylos Combat Agate is just one of thousands of items from the grave site in Pylos. The two archaeologists previously said the grave was probably that of a male warrior aged 30 to 35, or possibly a priest.


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