New Meteora Museum Reveals Greek Site’s Ancient Past (video)



A new museum at the site of central Greece’s epic Meteora rock formations will boost tourist traffic and benefit the whole regions, officials have said.

The Museum of Geological Formations of Meteora in Kastraki was inaugurated earlier this week, housed in a 1902 building that used to serve as the Kastraki Elementary School until 1985.

It was used as a local government building until 2012, when it was decided to host the museum.

Thessaly Governor Kostas Agorastos described the difficulties of the project, underlined its importance to the local communities and the region and thanked all those who contributed to its realization.

Kalambaka Mayor Christos Sinanis described the museum as an important project that finally exhibited the natural beauties of the area.

The 460-square-meter museum building is divided in three sections: Hall A (waiting room), Hall B (General Geology Hall) and Hall C (Meteora Geological History Hall).

In Hall A there are audiovisual presentations of Meteora, such as a 15-minute video on the creation of the rocks and the nearby Koziaka Mountains. Hall B is a space of introduction to the region’s general geology and attempts to inform the visitor of how the Earth, rocks and minerals were created. There are also fossils, minerals and rocks from all over Greece.

Hall C is the largest space of the museum where the creation of Meteora is presented. The visitor is “transported” to a time 30 million years ago and observes the geographical site of ​​Meteora as a marine area. Then, with a brief presentation of the concepts of tectonic elevation and erosion, the current Meteora formation is presented. Visitors can also see rocks of Meteora, as well as fossils from surrounding areas.

The Meteora Geological Formations Museum in Kastraki is open to the public with free admission, as reported by the Municipality of Kalambaka.