Athens Museum Echoes to Hymns Sung for Ancient Greek Gods



Lyravlos perform at a n earlier concert. Photo: lyravlos.gr

Athens’ National Archaeological Museum has been echoing to the sound of hymns sung to the Greek gods thousands of years ago.

Marking World Music Day celebrations, a group of musicians, Lyravlos, performed using ancient instruments such as the phorminx, the kitharis, the krotala and the aulos.

Lyravlos have made exact replicas of the ancient instruments from natural materials including animal shells, bones, hides and horns.

Music was an integral part of almost every aspect of ancient Greek society, from religious ceremonies to social to athletic events.

Although much has been said and written about its major role in everyday life, there is still very much to be investigated in this area of the ancient Greek arts.

The absence of written remains of ancient Greek music has for centuries created the impression that music was not a very advanced chapter of the arts in Ancient Greece.

Today only some 60 written scores of ancient Greek music have survived, Lyravlos member Michael Stefos told Reuters.

Stefos said they interpret them as best they can, relying on the accuracy of their recreated instruments. “Joking aside, ancient CDs have never been found,” he said.

Lyravlos in an earlier performance