Why There Are as Many Chapels and Churches on Mykonos as There Are Families



    When you think of Mykonos you think of one of the most popular party islands of the Greek islands, The truth of the matter is that it is also one of the most adorned islands with traditionally styled churches and charming little chapels. Why does this island have as many chapels and churches?

    There is a total of some 600-800 churches, monasteries and small chapels on the island of Mykonos, which ends up resulting in one church or chapel per local family!

    Although the majority of small churches and chapels are thought to be constructed as the centerpiece of the yearly religious festive celebrations called “Paniguria”, which takes place on various days throughout the year, there are many reasons why the hillsides of Mykonos are packed with these stunning religious structures.

    Many of the churches and chapels on the island date back to the Byzantine error up until the 19th century and have been declared historical monuments by the Ministry of Culture.

    However, not all churches are old and many modern churches are built as a religious act of devotion or to commemorate where a miracle is believed to have taken place.

    Also, as part of the Mykonian customs, chapels, and churches on the island were built to place the bones of dead family members in a shrine. this is still practiced in modern times across the island.

    Historically, churches and small chapels were built around the island facing the sea to aid in the safe voyage and return of sailors.

    Mykonos Town (Chora) alone has over 60 churches, so you should definitely visit some of them while on Mykonos. Here is a sample of what the island has to offer:

    Panagia Paraportiani is a popular destination as this unique complex of five churches, four of which are on the ground and the fifth on the roof, has become known as an iconic symbol of the island of Mykonos. It is located in Kastro.

    Agia Kyriaki is a charming little church and is located in Agia Kyriaki square in Mykonos Town. Its red-painted domes and white-washed walls are the backdrop to a modern-day cafeteria where many locals and tourists sit and enjoy the church while sipping coffee.

    Agios Nikolaos off the Harbor in the old port of Mykonos is known by locals as “Agios Nikolakis”, denoting its small size. It is located in the old port of Mykonos Town along the sea and was built in the 4th century to honor Saint Nikolaos, the patron saint of fisherman.

    The only Catholic church on the island has been dedicated to the Virgin of St. Rosary since 1668 and is called the Catholic church of Panagia Rodario. It is near the iconic windmills of Mykonos. The church caught on fire on May Day in 1991 and the icon of the Virgin of Rosary suffered damages although it has since been restored. Services still take place in this small church year round.