“Desperados” Unveils the Present Reality of Greek Youth



“Desperados”, a play written by George Iliopoulos and directed by Charalabos Loukopoulos, is about a group of college students that have just graduated from law school. When audiences walk into the Dimotiko Theatre Kallithea in Athens, they seen an on-set scene taken from a college party. As the play begins and the actors start to walk on stage, it is obvious they are all in their early or mid-20’s.

Tonight is the last party for a group of friends that just graduated from Law School. “Tomorrow” has become the “present”, the dreams of these young lawyers of “tomorrow”, their friendships, their passions, and their mental endurance are tested in one night – the countdown to a new year. These young lawyers are facing the system, society and themselves within their unexpected comic tragedies.

Anna, Stella and Petro (Dimitra Karakonstandi, Nitsa Mamouzelou and Gavriil Sferopoulos) are people that have studied law to fulfill their parents’ dreams. They hate the system and want to stick it to The Man, even though they now have become The Man. Strato and Kelly (Ilias Maziotis and Anna Spiridaki) have just announced their engagement; they were motivated to become lawyers for the money and reputation. Kelly, the type of Greek girl that has to be married by the age of 30 and thinks that she has found the man of her dreams, believes he will give her the love and stability she believes she needs. Stefano (Chrisostomos Abdelaal) is the poor small town boy who grew up on a farm and wants to prove to the world that he can make something of himself. Last but not least Dimitri (Giannis Fragiskos) is the craziest of the group but speaks the truth, and no one listens to him.

The first half of the play was all comedy, as evinced by the audience’s constant laughter. Stella and Dimitri are fighting like children, but everyone can tell there is a small crush behind all that fighting. Kelly and Strato talk about how amazing their lives are going to be from now on, the big house and children that they will have, and all the money that Strato will make as a lawyer. Anna and Stefano try to make their relationship work, but it seems that Anna wants different things and also wants to be with different people. Dimitri, being…well, Dimitri, lays in a box sleeping throughout most of the play, only walking up in rounds and making fun of the system, society, Strato and Kelly and of course Stella.

The second half of the play assumes a more serious tone, as everyone checks into reality and stops dreaming. The only thing is that it didn’t really link with the first half, and audiences got lost in translation. Overall, the play was well written, well directed and the roles were well played. Since the actors are young, and are just starting their careers, they did their best in playing their roles and capturing the moment most young Greek people are facing today.

“Desperados” plays on Mondays and Tuesdays at 9:15 pm at the Dimotiko Theatre Kallithea in Athens. Tickets are 16 euros, student tickets are 12 euros, and it runs for 120 minutes with a brief intermission.


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