Greeks Getting Milked on Dairy Price



    milk

    The price of fresh milk in Greece is the third most expensive in Europe, behind Cyprus and Italy.

    From now on, there will be two types of milk in the Greek market: fresh milk with two-day expiry and long-lasting milk with a shelf-life of 11 days.

    The move is testing the cohesion of the Greek coalition government.

    How much does milk costs in other European countries? Germany’s milk is the cheapest and costs from 0.48 to 0.69 euros while the most expensive costs from 1.19 to 1.29 euros. In England, the milk costs from one pound to 1.10 pounds, i.e. from 1.20 to 1.32 euros. In France, it costs from 0.83 to 1.37 euros while in Spain the milk costs from 0.82 to 1.39 euros.

    The following table is based on Eurostat’s data as released by the Greek Ministry of Development.

    COUNTRIES PRICE PER LITRE
     Italy  1.49
     Cyprus  1.33
     Greece  1.28
     Luxembourg  1.28
     Romania  1.01
     Austria  0.98
     Bulgaria  0.97
     Latvia  0.96
     Turkey  0.94
     Netherlands  0.88
     Slovakia  0.88
     Finland  0.83
     Lithuania  0.82
     Malta  0.81
     Hungary  0.80
     Portugal  0.79
     Spain  0.77
     Czech Republic  0.76
     Croatia  0.76
     Ireland  0.74
     United Kingdom  0.73
     Poland  0.61

     


    3 COMMENTS

    1. Milk in many respects is a metaphor for what wrong with our economy. The reason why Greek milk is so expensive and German milk so cheap boils down to efficiency. This in large part because we focus on manual labour low skilled industries like tourism rather than technology and science like the Germans do.

      For a very long time our milk prices, rules and subsides were being determined by special interests within Greece rather than the market. This was done at taxpayer expense (see our debt which is the culmination of not only diary bureaucracy but many many industries). Now that these rules and subsidies are being removed prices are rising. However, ultimately the price is about the same because the hidden costs (the costs were being paid by the Greek taxpayer) are being removed one my one. In short, we are starting to see the true cost it takes a Greek dairy farmer to produce milk, and it ain’t pretty. However, by sticking to principles, the long term price should eventually drop with the introduction of foreign competitors.

      If we wish to compete in milk, or any industry whatsoever, there is only two ways to do it… either by accepting lowering wages or through better utilization of technology.

      The latter makes far more sense but its much harder, requires extensive effort, education and intellect… rather than senselessly and endlessly self-righteous whining like lunatics for government save us (as is the norm among many Greeks on even this very website) Until we break this entitlement mentality so common among Greeks (especially among incompetent leftists like Tsipiras with shamelessly preach this attitude rather than personal responsibility and production) our second world economy will go nowhere. It’s same attitude that got us into massive debt. Too many people sticking their hands out. Not enough people contributing.

      Expecting a handful of politicians to “save” millions of people sitting idly is a recipe for failure. The hard truth is that those millions of people need to save themselves. All our politicians can do at this juncture is try to stay out of their way as much as possible.

    2. This article is painting a skewed picture. An in-efficient industry is a problem. But no where near as bad not having the industry at all.
      If your wifes not a good cook you don’t go out and buy breakfast, lunch, snacks, and dinner everyday. If you don’t like doing housework to don’t go & get a nanny. If your no good at washing clothes you don’t go the laundrymat everyday, and so on because you’ll go broke!
      Similar situation here.

    3. The lack of a good organization, planned strategy and mismanagement of the system is causing mayhem in the country. Everyone think for themselves and how they can milk us for more money. A country without any plans is a country without any infrastructure.