Latest Greek Doctor Scam



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Ten public hospital doctors, also members of DePuy company, have been charged with fraud.

The case concerns the supply of highly priced orthopedic products to the Greek State, supplied by the company Johnson & Johnson group.

The Greek judicial authorities uncovered that the cost of orthopedic products was so high because some extra “bonuses” for doctors were tacked on the price.

The case file data revealed that the orthopedic products were being sold for 35 percent above the company’s normal price, while the doctors’ bribes reached 20 percent of the cost, an amount that the Greek public sector had to pay.

The investigators of the case, Sp. Georgouleas and Chr. Markou, are expected to summon approximately 30 people suspected of being involved in the case, to testify. Those involved will be charged with a series of felonies depending on their involvement, such as misappropriation of public funds, being an accomplice and instigator of fraud, bribery and money-laundering.


5 COMMENTS

  1. The issue here is the Greek Public Sector didn’t have to pay. They did so as they were not doing their jobs while in all likelihood taking some of the bribe money to look the other way.

  2. And remove and take them off the register so they will not practice ever again.But most of all confiscate their properties before caging them.All these provided they are found guilty.

  3. Greek doctors are extremely corrupt.
    I had the misfortune to go to the Voula hospital emergency and was told by the doctor that took care of me that not only did he expect a “tip” but I had to give his assistant a “tip” also.

  4. Once again Hippocrates is rolling over in his grave. Although there are great and brilliant doctors in Greece–some actually heroes who work in the public sweat houses called clinics, there is another breed, too. These are the “doctors” who have a stethoscope in one large pocket of their lab coat and the other full of thick envelopes–the result of their unethical deal making with the patient’s family.

    When I came to Greece 20 years ago I was told it was expected to give the doctor an envelope to assure the best care. I’m not sure whose oath that corresponds to in the ancient world, but Hippocrates was reported to not to be so vile.