Police Put Xeros, Mazios Behind Bank Blast



Escaped November 17 terrorist Christodoulos Xeros
Escaped November 17 terrorist Christodoulos Xeros

A car bomb that exploded outside a Bank of Greece office in downtown Athens on April 10 was likely the work of two terrorists from different groups who are on the loose, police said.

Authorities said the device may have been planted by November 17 terrorist Christodoulos Xeros, who walked away from a prison furlough in January, and Revolutionary Struggle leader Nikos Maziotis, who vanished in July 2012 after being released from detention because he hadn’t been tried.

Maziotis’s involvement was suspected from the beginning while the possible involvement of Xeros is being examined partly due to the fact that the car used in the blast was Japanese – a Nissan Sunny, the type the group used to use before being broken up 10 years ago.

A police source told Kathimerini that the choice of vehicle was “a return to the past” and “reminiscent of an old generation of terrorists’ methodology.”

Revolutionary Struggle has claimed responsibility for several car bomb hits including at the headquarters of Citibank in Kifissia, northern Athens, in February 2009 and at the Athens Stock Exchange in September that year. N17 claimed several hits using car bombs in the 1980s and 1990s.

The two suspects each have a one million euro bounty on them for information leading to their capture.

In a letter posted on an anarchist website recently Maziotis denied reports of a cooperation with Xeros but police are discounting that for now. After he disappeared, Xeros posted an Internet video vowing a return to violence.

Xeros was given a holiday vacation despite serving six life sentences for his role in six murders, including five people over the years attached to the U.S. Embassy in Athens. Authorities now are going to tighten the rules on conditional releases for terrorists and hardened criminals.