Rallies Held in Athens Ahead of Bailout Vote – Rioters Clash With Police Outside Greek Parliament



Greeks-Marched-Through-Central-AthensClashes broke out between police and rioters around the Greek Parliament in downtown Athens on Wednesday.

Greek lawmakers are now convening in parliament to vote on the provisional bailout deal that would bring more austerity measures and reforms in exchange for an estimated 86 billion euros.

13,000 people reportedly participated in Wednesday’s rallies in protest of the bailout deal.

Clashes broke out after unionists marched and arrived outside Greece’s parliament.

Police then clashed with people who were reportedly not part of the rallies. Riot police used tear gas against 100-150 people who threw small objects as well as molotov cocktails toward them.


9 COMMENTS

  1. The end of the Euro project is near. Politicians just don’t get it. All lawyers. Read History. Repeats as it always does.

  2. Seem to recall our leftists claimed our last coalition government, made of both moderate left and right, was “fascist” when Samaras supported cuts. Apparently Syriza is a “fascist” party now too. In fact everyone that doesn’t agree with the leftwing extremists is “fascist”. That would make over 90% of the world’s population “fascist” Everyone is antidemocratic except for the far leftist thugs throwing molitov cocktails for “democracy”.

    Do any of our alleged “moderate’ leftists still remember the cold war? You know. 100 million dead from communists…including over 100,000 Greeks that died during the civil war.

  3. The world’s media watching this, thinking Greece not a great place to set up company, and create jobs. It’s no wonder all the multinational companies are in Ireland, they got a bailout. As of 2015, Ireland was ranked as the world’s ninth most “economically free” economyin an index created by free-market economists from the Wall Street

  4. Stuck between a rock and a hard place the riots reflect the anguish and despair prevalent among the Greek people. A debt write-off followed by investment would provide the necessary platform to give this beleaguered people a chance for employment and the power to secure their future…

  5. This is the classic heartbreak of the lesser evil, where the choices are all terrible and you have to choose the option you hope is least terrible. With the banks closed, Greeks are out of money, so any option which did not open the banks would only make the immediate suffering worse. The worst option of all is starvation and growing social conflict. The option of an immediate Grexit would have meant the banks remained closed and food riots. It takes time to set up a new currency and totally reform the financial system. Greece ran out of time and money.

    Gandhi defined economic warfare as slow torture, but there comes a point, which Greece arrived at, when the pain is unbearable and you have to, at least in the short run and even it you “don’t believe in it” agree to a deal that promises more suffering but provides an immediate influx of money.

    Has Syriza betrayed the people? How long would they last if the banks remained closed, pensions were not paid, and food disappeared from the shelves? There is a fascist right wing ready to take over if the the economy stays shut down any longer. Could Syriza have stood on principle? You can’t eat principle.

    The best that can be said is that this deal gives Greece food on the table for now and time to prepare for an exit if no other way out is found, since even the IMF had admitted the loan burden is unsustainable. That leave two more possiblities:
    1. The Greek people rebel (which could lead to an exit or a right wing seizure of power)–this would be messy, but as both Jefferson and Marx pointed out, there is no significant change without bloodshed.
    2. The IMF will be the final NO vote, and force either an exit or a debt haircut. It is calling for a debt haircut but the other creditors are standing “on principle.” In other words, it comes down to blood in the streets or the European financial elites coming to blows and finally forcing a Greek exit. While this has been presented in the media as their great fear, it may in fact (for they all know Greece cannot pay back these loans and more austerity will only make it worse), be their ulterior agenda. Dump the basketcase they have created and make an example of Greece to intimidate other nations which may think of saying NO to the financial elites.

    Greece is 2% of the EU population, and both its economic power and its debt, is a drop in the bucket. The underlying motives may be not economic but political: to establish absolute control of the remaining nations, led by the German bankers,

    I never thought I would be rooting for the IMF, but in this case, they be the last obstacle to the total surrender of Greece to it predatory creditors. I am going to Athens in 3 weeks to join the protests, and I am taking a pocketful of cash, just in case.

  6. Civil unrest as a result of financial stress, poverty, and for many, hunger may cause another train of events for which the EU oligarchs will be directly responsible… A debt write-off is getting closer and closer…

  7. Do any of our alleged “moderate’ right still remember WW2? You know. 80 million dead from fascists…including over 800,000 Greeks that died. A war which directly caused the Civil War due to the power vacuum caused by the Nazis

    and yes Syriza is. fascism is the prevalent problem in this world, not anything else

    4 Germans were arrested for throwing molitov cocktails as well as other foreigners

  8. Democratic center right does not mean “fascism” but a self-described Marxist that wants Euro-communism is someone seeking the extreme of communism.

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