Tsipras Slams New Democracy, Praises FYROM Name Deal and Reforms



In the traditional Thessaloniki International Fair press conference on Sunday, Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras praised the work of his administration while accusing the main opposition of far-right leanings.

Answering questions from representatives of the Greek media, Tsipras defended himself and his cabinet for the East Attica fire disaster, the harsh economic policies, the controversial Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia name deal, and other issues that his administration has been criticized for.

Tsipras said that during his administration there have been important reforms such as unification of insurance funds, the improvement of the cadastre, the modernization of public administration, the institutional secretary-general and other reforms.

On the Mati disaster where 98 people lost their lives, Tsipras said that his ministers were there from day one to “listen to the people’s anger”. “This is a big bet for the government, and me personally, to repair the damages and to support these people and correct the pathogenesis of the past.” At the same time, he accused the opposition of propaganda against his administration after the fires.

Regarding the FYROM name agreement, Tsipras said that his administration seized the opportunity to solve a problem that was lingering for decades. He said that the neighboring country changed its name and constitution in times of peace and this is unprecedented and that he considers that a great diplomatic success.

At the same time, he said, after the FYROM name resolution, Greece becomes the dominant country in the Balkans and the epicenter of this geopolitical area.

Regarding his promise to raise the minimum wage, Tsipras said that the issue will be discussed with Greece’s European partners and he is optimistic that the surpassing of fiscal targets will allow it.

Tsipras also accused main opposition New Democracy for being an extreme neoliberal, far-rightist party and that if they come to power they will bring back the International Monetary Fund, as happened in Argentina.