Ancient Greek Technology Museum Candidate for European Museum of the Year



The museum aims to highlight this relatively under-appreciated aspect of ancient Greek civilization, and to prove that the technology of the ancient Greeks is shockingly similar to modern technology. Photo by Kotsanas Museum

The Costas Kotsanas Museum of Ancient Greek Technology in Athens was nominated as the  “European Museum of 2019” by the European Museum Forum (EMF) on Thursday.

The results of the prestigious competition will be announced in May of 2019.

The Kostas Kotsanas Museum of Ancient Greek Technology is located on Pindarou Street in central Athens. It features working reconstructions of brilliant but little-known ancient Greek mechanical inventions.

This is the third museum in Greece to be recognized for presenting ancient Greek technological achievements. All of the museums were founded by Costas Kotsanas, a brilliant Patras University engineer. The first museum opened at the site of Ancient Olympia in 2003 and the second in Katakolo in 2013.

Born in Seliana, Achaia, in 1963, Kotsanas studied mechanical engineering at the Polytechnic University of Patras. The 300-odd exhibits in his remarkable museums contain operating models of ancient Greek inventions, from the “robot-servant machine” of Philon to the “Cinema of Heron”.

There is an automatic clock invented by the mathematic genius Ktesibios, and an early form of steam engine made of bronze. He also has a model of the priceless treasure recently found in a shipwreck, the “Antikythera Machine”, which is actually a form of analog computer made of bronze which was used to compute the movements of the stars.

The Athens museum focuses on musical instruments and games, and its funding comes from the 15-year-old cultural nonprofit organization which the Kotsanas family created to promote ancient Greek technology.

The European Museum Forum is a cultural organization founded in 1977 under the Council of Europe. It is an independent, non-profit charity, registered in the United Kingdom.

Since its inception, its objective has been to recognize the best museum practices across Europe and to encourage innovative developments in the museum sector.

With information from A.M.N.A.