German Ex-Finance Minister Schäuble Admits ”I Asked a Lot From The Greeks”



Wolfgang Schaeuble with former Greek Finance Minister, Yianis Varoufakis. File photo from 2015

Wolfgang Schäuble, the former Finance minister of Germany and the current President of the German Parliament, gave an interview to Berliner Morgenpost newspaper on Monday in which he admitted that he ”asked a lot from the Greeks” during the peak of the financial crisis.

Schäuble, who was one of the main political figures whose decisions shaped the course of the Greek and Eurozone financial crisis between 2010 and 2017, said that he had ”good reasons” to ask a lot from the Greek nation.

The former minister expressed his concerns for Europe’s future ahead of the upcoming crucial European Elections this May, noting that ”the problems are huge and so urgent that no country can handle them alone.”

The Bundestag chief said that ”we need more Europe, but the resistance to the European Union is getting bigger,” noting that the upcoming elections come as an opportunity for this very reason.

Schäuble also urged all Europeans to actively participate in the May elections.

After his remarks on what he asked the Greeks to do during the peak of the financial crisis, Schäuble expressed his concerns about the future of the Eurozone. He stated that ”the differences in the competitiveness of individual member states have become larger, rather than smaller.”

He also added that ”a common currency will, in the long run, require a common financial, economic and labor market policy,” issues that are determined at a national rather than a European level.

Schäuble served as Germany’s finance minister from 2009 until 2017.