Molotov Cocktails Thrown At Police Station, Journalist’s Car in Athens



File photo

A group of approximately ten people wearing hooded sweatshirts attacked the Kaisariani police station throwing Molotov cocktails at around four o’clock in the morning local time (02:00 GMT+1), only two hours after the car belonging to the famous Greek journalist Mina Karamitrou was burnt in a deliberate attack.

Burnt hulk of car belonging to journalist Mina Karamitrou. Photo by in.gr

Five people were arrested immediately after an attack in which Molotov cocktails were thrown at an Athens police station, but they were all released soon afterward, as there was no valid evidence found to incriminate them.

Stratos Mavroeidacos, the secretary of the Union of the Greek police guards, speaking with Greece’s public ERT1 broadcaster, said ”our colleague, the guard who was in front of the Kaisariani police station, was saved miraculously, as a group of people threw against him at least ten Molotov cocktails.”

The unfortunate guard suffered minor injuries to his arms and on his head.

Unfortunately, this is nothing new for Athens.

For decades now, the Greek capital, and especially its city center, has suffered from the criminal activity of groups infamously known in Greece as the ”koukouloforoi” (those who wear hoodies).

Individuals from these groups have been known to throw Molotov cocktails, rocks and petrol bombs, mainly at police stations — but their attacks have also been targeted toward journalists, political parties and even foreign embassies.

The fact that these groups rarely pay for their crimes has made the Greek society call them ”Gnostoi-agnostoi,” the ”Known-unknowns.” This fuels the widespread belief that the authorities know who just they are, but they do not prosecute them, for reasons which continue to remain unknown to the public.