Greece-US Relations to Remain Solid Assures US Ambassador to Athens



US Ambassador to Athens Geoffrey Pyatt (right) with New Democracy vice president Adonis Georgiadis. Photo: Athens – Macedonian News Agency

(This is a translation of an opinion piece written by Michail Ignatiou in the Hellas Journal)

The United States Ambassador to Athens is, without a doubt, a controversial diplomat. He is perhaps one of the few who makes statements on issues concerning domestic politics as well.

Geoffrey Pyatt is cautious and tries to avoid provoking – even though sometimes this is not the case – and he seeks to have contacts with all political parties except KKE (the Greek Communist Party), that doesn’t want it either. He has become an “ambassador’ for Greek tourism, where he fares well, and for Greek investments, where things could be better.

On the subject of financial support, the US superpower is trailing behind China and will soon have to make decisions because it will lose the game in Greece, with which it maintains traditional ties and a strategic alliance.

During the traditional reception in the garden of the ambassador’s home on the occasion of Independence Day, Pyatt made a speech that contained several meanings. It was also an assurance that the relationship (between Greece and the U.S.) will not change at all with Kyriakos Mitsotakis as prime minister.

He also decided to talk about the election, a move that surprised many, but it seemed to be a “clearing out of intentions,” because much has been said and heard about his alleged relationship with the government of Alexis Tsipras, but also about his alleged conflict with the leader of New Democracy, Kyriakos Mitsotakis, who is now the new Prime Minister.

Greece, he said, elects the first post-crisis government, demonstrating the resilience of its democratic values ​​and institutions, even in the midst of an economic recession of unprecedented depth and length.

He assured that no matter whom Greeks choose as their next leader, America will remain fully committed to their success. “Our states,” he stressed, “are forever connected by our common democratic ideals.”

The previous left-wing government of Greece chose to tie itself in the chariot of America as soon as it realized that our friends and partners in Europe were determined to continue the punishment of the Greek people. In February 2015, one month after the election of Alexis Tsipras, the then president of America, Barack Obama, made a powerful intervention in favor of Greek citizens through CNN that moved us all. It was then that the now former Prime Minister (Alexis Tsipras) felt the need to turn to Washington for help.

The truth is that Obama saved him from the “claws” of the Europeans in July 2015, and stopped the expulsion of Greece from the eurozone. But he did not give that extra something that Tsipras expected, so our country remains troubled until today.

Pyatt said on the 4th of July that there is a broad consensus in Washington that Greece has become one of America’s most important regional allies. “It is a pillar of stability and a guardian of Western democratic ideals in a particularly difficult region,” he said.