Five Shipwrecks Discovered During New Explorations off Kasos Island



    A diver retrieves an ancient pot. Credit: Skai.gr

    Five different shipwrecks which have already revealed important findings were discovered recently off the coast of Kasos Island in Greece’s Aegean Sea.

    During the exploration, which was funded by the Kasos Association of New York and was supported by the municipality of the island, divers discovered a series of archaeologically important wrecks dating all the way back to classical antiquity.

    More than one-third of the total area designated to be explored was covered by a total of sixty-seven team dives during the 2019 exploratory season.

    The initiative will continue in 2020 and 2021 to discover, study and identify findings in what is believed to have served as an important trading route and maritime crossroads area between civilizations for many centuries.

    This year’s discoveries include wrecks stretching from modern times all the way back to ancient Greece.

    The area of Kasos served as a maritime crossroads for centuries between the great civilizations of the eastern Mediterranean

    The most recent shipwreck was a boat that sank in the modern era which was carrying construction material.

    Another shipwreck dated back to the era of the Greek War of Independence in the 1820s.

    Divers also found fascinating shipwrecks from the Byzantine era, from the 8-10th century AD, and even an ancient Greek ship which is believed to have sunk in the 1st century BC.

    The very oldest shipwreck to be founding the recent dives off the coast of Kasos dates back to the 4th century BC.

    This wreck contained four different types of ancient pottery, making its discovery particularly important archaeologically.

    Among the other items uncovered during this diving season were individual amphorae and other ceramics as well as an array of other objects used during the specific eras of each of the wrecks.