EU Backs Greece on Maritime Dispute; Declares Turkey-Libya Deal Illegal



European Union leaders meeting in Brussels for a second day on Friday issued a statement rejecting the Turkey-Libya maritime border deal as invalid and insisting that the pact interferes with the rights of other countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea.

The conclusions of the Summit note that the maritime deal is a violation of international law and Greece’s sovereignty.

“The Turkey-Libya Memorandum of Understanding on the delimitation of maritime jurisdictions in the Mediterranean Sea infringes upon the sovereign rights of third States, does not comply with the Law of the Sea and cannot produce any legal consequences for third States. The European Council unequivocally reaffirms its solidarity with Greece and Cyprus regarding these actions by Turkey,” the conclusion states.

Speaking to reporters following the conclusion of the European Council, PM Mitsotakis sent a message of self-confidence and certainty to all Greeks.

“I want everyone to know that we have composure and self-confidence, that we have a plan, not just because we have the right on our side but because we have very strong allies, who will support Greece when it comes to the defense of its sovereign rights,” he said.

“I requested and received the full support of all my counterparts, the full support of Greece from all the EU member states against Turkish provocations,” the Greek PM noted with particular emphasis.

Sending a direct message to Ankara, the Prime Minister of Greece did not exclude any possible reaction on behalf of the country, if and when Turkey attempts to violate its sovereign rights.

“Greece will do whatever is necessary to defend its sovereign rights. We are clear on this, we will defend Greece’s sovereign rights in any possible way,” Mitsotakis declared.

On November 27, Turkey signed a memorandum of understanding on maritime zones with Libya which ignores Greece, Egypt, and Cyprus — countries that also border the Mediterranean Sea.

Moreover, the deal does not take into consideration the fact that between Turkey and Libya lies Crete — which is by far the largest island in Greece.