Spectacular Findings Uncovered in Santorini’s Akrotiri Archaeological Dig



Some of the recent findings at Santorini’s Akrotiri archaeological site. Photo credit: Greek Ministry of Culture

Significant new findings were recently revealed during ongoing excavation works at the archaeological site of Akrotiri, on the Greek island of Santorini (Thera), the Ministry of Culture of Greece announced in a statement on Thursday.

Most of the discoveries are related to the everyday life of the people who lived on the island before the volcanic explosion which destroyed most of the island and subsequently the Minoan civilization on Crete.

Some of the most recent findings at the Akrotiri site. Photo credit: Greek Ministry of Culture

Ordinary objects used by the people of the island, even including clothing and burned fruit, were found, most likely believed to be the very last objects the people of Santorini were using in the moments before the devastating volcanic eruption.

Additionally, more than 130 micelle vessels were found, which archaeologists believe were most likely related to a burial place.

Painted black and white pottery found at the Akrotiri site. Photo credit: Greek Ministry of Culture

The archaeological dig on Santorini is taking place under the auspices of the Greek Archaeological Society and under the direction of Professor Christos Doumas.

The statement from the Ministry of Culture informs the public that among the new discoveries are ”four vessels, partially discovered in earlier excavations.”

Other findings include bronze objects, including two large double braids and miniature horn cores, as well as small fragments and beads from one or more necklaces.

Beads found by archaeologists at the Akrotiri site. Photo credit: Greek Ministry of Culture

Among dozens of other new findings, the Ministry of Culture noted that an inscription, consisting of Linear A syllables and an ideogram, was found written in ink on an object which is most likely related to the use of a building, also uncovered in the dig.

 

Exquisite pottery shell and other small objects found at the Akrotiri site. Credit: Ministry of Culture of Greece

The Ministry of Culture concluded by saying that scientists expect many additional smaller and larger findings to be uncovered in the next phases of the works, which continue at the Akrotiri site.

Akrotiri, a Bronze Age settlement from Santorini’s Minoan culture, was destroyed in a massive volcanic eruption sometime in the 16th century BC.

The city was completely buried in volcanic ash, which preserved the remains of fine frescoes and many other artworks and objects, much like what occurred later in the city of Pompeii, near Italy’s Mt. Vesuvius.