Survey Finds Older Greeks Overwhelmingly Prefer In-Person Banking



Despite banks currently offering a plethora of online services, a majority of Greece’s senior citizens prefer to wait in their bank’s lobby to complete their transactions. Photo credit: www.flickr.com/qtea

According to a recent survey undertaken by the Active Citizens Fund program, a majority of Greek people over the age of 60 prefer to complete their banking duties in person rather than online.

The data showed that despite living in an age of advanced technology and easy access to the internet, many Greeks who are over the age of 60 are willing to stand in lines — sometimes long lines — to do business or pay bills, rather than doing so remotely.

As a matter of fact, the survey found that if a bank were to close one of their branches, fully 20 percent of the senior citizens who were using it would even opt to switch banks in order to still be able to stand in line while avoiding having to use their old bank’s online services.

This trend also extended to other public services and utilities as well. When a poll was taken by the Association of Workers and Consumers in Greece recently, the results disclosed that many avoided using their phones and computers to pay these types of bills due to not knowing how to use the devices.

Other factors in this tendency to avoid technology included a lack of information regarding consumer rights regarding online transactions as well as a lack of trust in virtual security.

When Greeks over the age of 60 were asked about how familiar they were with the internet, only 42.35 percent reported “A little” while 22.4 percent admitted to not being familiar with it “At all.”

Attempts by banks to get elderly Greeks to switch to online services have not worked, with only 27.05 percent of seniors saying that they would use the internet if their branch were to close.

Currently, only 31.97 percent of Greeks over the age of 60 do their banking online, while a majority prefer the socialization aspects of conducting in-person banking business. They also said they enjoyed the ability to take advantage of services offered in person, rather than by computer.

The Active Citizens Fund is a program of the European Economic Area, which is funded in fifteen countries, including Greece. The purpose of the organization is to enhance the lives of those who are over the age of 60.