Restoration of Greece’s Tatoi Palace Unearths Dozens of Royal Heirlooms 



Some of the Royal carriages found in the Tatoi. Credit: Greek Ministry of Culture

The ongoing restoration works that have been taking place in Greece’s Tatoi Palace for a couple of months now have brought back to life some hidden historical treasures.

Hundreds of objects of various sizes, all belonging to the former Royal Family of Greece, have been found in a number of different buildings on the Tatoi Palace grounds.

A Royal suitcase. Credit: Greek Ministry of Culture

Among the recent discoveries, the renovation workers found a total of seventy suitcases and trunks, all believed to belong to Frederica, the Queen Consort of Greece, from 1947 to 1964, and Queen mother thereafter.

Work on uncovering these treasures in the Tatoi is being supervised by archaeologists, who are tasked with making sure that these precious artifacts of Greece’s modern history will not be damaged.

The restoration has also unearthed exquisite royal horse carriages, as well as dozens of unopened bottles of red wine, dating back to the 1950s.

The Tatoi estate covers an enormous total area of 4,500 hectares, which is approximately 45 million square meters or 45,000 Greek stremmata.

It was first bought by the Greek royal family in the 1870s. Since then, it has endured numerous changes of ownership and usage, following the turbulent political life of the country during the late 19th and the 20th century.

Originally designed as a summer retreat for the family, it later became the permanent residence of the Greek royals, who found its premises more private compared to the official Royal Palace (now the Presidential Palace) in downtown Athens.

The Tatoi Palace is expected to become a museum when all the restoration work is complete.